Hedge Fund Professional Sam Tabar Is Reaching New Career Heights With His COO And CFO Titles

After making a name for himself as an attorney and a capital strategist, Sam Tabar serves as the CFO of Awearable Apparel and the COO of FullCycle Energy Fund. New York City-based Awearable Apparel offers children’s clothing embedded with technology so parents can track their child, while FullCycle invests in technologies for electric generation plants to use waste instead of fossil fuels. Learn more about Sam Tabar: https://angel.co/sam-tabar

Oxford-educated, Tabar also has a law degree from Columbia University, where he served as an associate editor for the Columbia Business Law Review. With degrees from two of the world’s most prestigious universities, he had no difficulty securing a position as an associate at Skadden, Arps, Slater, Meager & Flom LLP on Wall Street in New York City.

Next, Tabar took a position with PMA Investment Advisors in Hong Kong, where he managed a $2 billion hedge fund and Tabar developed non-traditional asset raising strategies for the firm as well. Having a noteworthy international career, Tabar learned how to speak a little Japanese as well as fluent French. Read more about Sam: Ex-Merrill’s Tabar Joins Schulte Roth to Advise Hedge Funds

Sam Tabar went on to become the head of capital management for Bank of America Merrill Lynch in Hong Kong. Becoming a senior associate managing hedge funds at Schulte Roth & Zabel in 2013 brought Tabar back to the legal profession.

While Tabar specializes in hedge fund law and commodities investment for others, he has his own investment portfolio. THINX, one of the companies that Tabar invested in 2015, makes women’s underwear for use during menstruation. Every purchase helps provide menstruation supplies for women in Uganda, who frequently miss school or work for a lack of sanitary napkins.

When counseling others about their investments, Tabar suggests that novice investors stay away from commodity trading due to the amount of research involved and the short-term losses that are common. Instead, Tabar suggests a diversified portfolio, possibly companies led by social entrepreneurs, such as THINX.